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Capt Lou's Nautical News 1/1/12
Posted on: Mon 02-Jan-2012

WARM TEMPERATURES HURT RIVER HERRING STOCK
Warmer than normal air and water temperatures have scientists concerned about the health of river herring. We just had the second warmest November on record, and December is running almost 6 degrees above normal. Since 1970, air temperatures in the Northeast have gone up by half a degree every decade according to a 2007 climate change study. Scientists project that within 50 years, Massachusetts could have temperatures and a climate similar to what exists in Virginia now. These higher temperatures could push pond, river, or stream water to the point where herring can't survive when they return from the ocean to spawn.

TRAGEDY HITS FLORIDA KEYS DIVE BOAT
During Christmas vacation week, tragedy struck a Florida Keys dive boat with 8 passengers on board. The 25 foot boat named the Get Wet took on water and rolled over in a matter of minutes, trapping two female passengers in its small cabin. When rescuers arrived on scene, both women were unconscious. One woman could not be revived and died, while the other was transported to the hospital in critical condition. The dive boat is owned and operated by Key Largo Scuba Shack. Seatow was able to salvage the vessel and tow it to land where officials are investigating the cause of sinking.

COAST GUARD STUDYING WIND FARMS EFFECT ON TRAFFIC
The Coast Guard is now doing a large scale study of commercial and pleasure boat traffic up and down the Atlantic coast from Maine to Florida because of more than a dozen offshore wind farm projects that are in the works. Some of these wind farms will be located in or very near the traditional routes used by vessels traveling up and down the coast. It is important that the Coast Guard receive comments from commercial and recreational boaters who operate within 200 nautical miles of the shoreline on the potential impacts of these wind farms. Comments will be accepted through January 31st.

RECORD PRICES FOR MAINE SCALLOPS
Scallop fishermen in Maine say they expect to get record prices this coming year because of a diminished supply from Japan. For many years, sea scallops, which are different from bay scallops, have been one of Maine's most valuable seafood, second only to lobsters.

TEAM TELEFONICA WINS 2ND LEG OF VOLVO OCEAN RACE
Team Telefónica finished first in part one of the 2nd leg of the Volvo Ocean Race which ended at an undisclosed destination far offshore to protect the six-boat fleet from pirates. It beat the second place boat Team Camper by 1 minute 57 seconds. The boats will now be shipped to a point in the northern United Arab Emirates to finish the remainder of the 2nd leg to Abu Dhabi.

TITANIC ARTIFACTS TO BE SOLD AT AUCTION
Artifacts from the Titanic will be sold at auction as one lot on April 1st 2012, but the winning bid will not be announced until April 15th, the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the world's most famous shipwreck. More than 5,000 items including fine china, ship fittings, and even sections of the ship's hull will be sold. The auction house estimates the value of the artifacts at $189 million.

RIGHT WHALES HANGING AROUND CAPE COD
Fishermen still report seeing north Atlantic right whales hanging around Cape Cod. Usually these animals migrate south before the cold water season begins in the northeast, but scientists admit their movement has always been somewhat of a mystery. While it has been believed that the female whales give birth and nurse their young in warmer waters off Georgia and Florida, it has always been a mystery where the male whales went. One possible explanation is that the whales go wherever there is a sufficient food supply. That appears to be the case in the waters off Cape Cod.

BOAT DAMAGED IN WHALE WARS
And last on today's nautical news, whale wars has heated up again as the Japanese whale boats go hunting in the Southern Antarctic Ocean despite the fact there has been a ban on commercial whaling for the past 25 years. The Japanese claim they kill about a 1000 whales a year for scientific research, but the whale meat has been found for sale in Japanese markets. The Sea Shepherd Conservation group does everything it can, using three boats, to interfere with the Japanese whale hunt. One of the Sea Shepherd boats is a go fast, high tech, wave piercing catamaran power boat named the Brigitte Bardot. During a high speed chase this past week, a rogue wave disabled that vessel forcing it be towed back to Australia. Last year, the Sea Shepherders ended Japan's whale hunt early. The official reason given by the Japanese was that the Sea Shepherders put the Japanese whaler's safety at risk.

"CELEBRATING 20 YEARS ON RADIO STATION 95.9FM WATD"
* Winner of Mass/Rhode Island Associated Press "BEST TALK SHOW"
* Recipient of Coast Guard's Joshua James Lifesaving Medal for public service
* Recipient of American Lighthouse Foundation's "LEN HADLEY AWARD"
* Winner of Boston's Achievement In Radio "BEST INTERVIEW" AWARD 
* Nominated Boston's A.I.R. "BEST PRODUCED PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAM"
* Recipient of Man of the Year Award - Metropolitan Yacht Club

Listen to the live broadcast of "Nautical Talk Radio" with Capt Lou and crew, Sunday mornings from 11 - 12 noon (Boston time) on radio station 95.9FM WATD, Marshfield, and streaming around the world on www.959watd.com. You can also listen to a replay of the most recent show anytime during the week at www.nauticaltalk.com.



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